Overcome Mental Limitations & Stand Out in Business w/ Nazia Khatun, Fitness Reborn

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You can’t win because nobody looks like you in the industry you want to enter? How can you stand out without losing what makes you you?
You feel defeated and misplaced? It’s completely normal, but know ONE thing: What makes you special are the vulnerable moments.

You can find strength in your experiences (both good and bad). Your surrounding doesn’t define you, your mental blocks don’t make you.

 

Alhamdulillah, Nazia Khatun, award winning fitness specialist speaks with us about:

 

  • Using your vulnerability as your strength
  • How to overcome cultural restrictions & mental limitations
  • Connecting fitness, religion, mindset and neuroscience
  • Why mental health and self love matter in business
  • How to make your voice heard, no matter what they say
  • Building a business in a crowded space
  • Finding and connecting to your right audience
  • How to speak to yourself and affirm
  • Authentic personal branding on Social Media

Comment below! Nazia’s question for you:

What is stopping you becoming who you want to be?

Leave it down in the comments, and share your diversity with us!

Don’t forget to subscribe to your Muslim Businesswoman Podcast & leave us a review on ApplePodcast – it truly (truly!) helps to bring more sisters to this channel & inshallah to benefit from the content!

 

Nazia Khatun Muslim Fitness Influencer Muslim Woman Podcast Shared Diversity with Sina Port
Nazia Khatun, award-winning fitness coach at Reborn UK talked with us about how to stand out and build a personal brand as a Muslim woman in business. She also talked about Sunnah health and how physical & mental health are interlinked with mindset. She gives practical tips on how to start a business while staying true to yourself.

 

 

Build a Career in Tech, Intentions & Growing a Community w/ Arfah Farooq, Muslamic Makers

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As a Muslim woman in business, we are constantly battling to grow our career while staying true to our values. But how can we truly live our full selves in a work environment that is not created to accommodate our Islamic values or traditions?

And what does it really take to grow a career in tech? Arfah Farooq, Co-founder of Muslamic Makers speaks with us about

  • How to build a career in tech
  • What really is representation in the media?
  • Navigating an Islamic identity in a corporate environment
  • Simple hacks to stop compromising your values and have difficult conversations
  • Building a personal brand as a woman of colour
  • Being a proud Muslim in the workplace
  • How to build a community based on trust and service
  • Making intention-based decisions in your career

Comment below! Arfah’s question for you:

Why do you do what you do?

Leave it down in the comments, and share your diversity with us!

Don’t forget to subscribe to your Muslim Businesswoman Podcast & leave us a review on ApplePodcast – it truly (truly!) helps to bring more sisters to this channel & inshallah to benefit from the content!

 

Arfah Farooq talked with Sina Port about personal branding for women of color & how to build a career based on your values and intentions as a Muslim woman in business.

 

How to start online, podcasting and balancing marriage & work with Ikhlas Saleem, creator of Identity Politics Podcast

Share Your Diversity 
Share Your Voice

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Disclaimer: This episode was a lot of fun! So be prepared to laugh inshallah!

Ikhlas Saleem is a writer, storyteller and digital media strategist, with a passion for religion, culture and education. She’s the creator of the Identity Politics Podcast.

In this episode, Ikhlas discussed with us how you can make it as a female founder starting to grow an online presence. As the founder of one of my favourite podcasts, she also shares her top tips to get into podcasting, find a co-host & build a team.

As both media marketers, founders &wives, we also talk about how to balance marriage and ambitions, and how to upgrade your productivity!

Make sure to listen till the end to find out the Top skills and attitudes to make it in digital media and reach your communities!

Comment below!

What are your
1. Personal ambitions for this New Year?
2. Fears, plans & visions?

Leave it down in the comments, and share your diversity with us!

Minutes of the Podcast:

Woman in Media
7:30
 Building confidence &  dealing with  self-doubt

14:30 Quality or quantity?
16:00 Building a brand
20:00 When you don’t agree with what you said a few years ago
Book recommendation – Malcolm X

Female founders / Starting a  podcast
32:30 Productivity habits 
39:00 How to create relevant content for your audience
44:00 Tips to start a podcast
47:00 How to choose your topics

Marriage vs ambition
54:00
 How to balance being a wive and work

55:30 About responsibilities 

Top skills and attitudes
01:01:01
To make it in media and reach your communities 

Tweetables

  1. Be willing to learn, especially in digital. @i_saleem #WomeninTech #success #ShareDiversity
  2. To be ready to change, you have to be okay with failure. @i_saleem #failure #success #ShareDiversity
  3. Progress means I knew this wasn't perfect, but I had to keep going. @i_saleem #progress #success #ShareDiversity
  4. Know your purpose. @i_saleem #purpose #success #ShareDiversity
  5. You need people who recognize that your content is quality and take the journey with you to get better. @i_saleem #success #ShareDiversity #MuslimPodcast
  6. What keeps me going is having a space to see myself reflected. @i_saleem #WomeninTech #ShareDiversity #MuslimPodcast

 

 

How to tell your own story – with Amina, founder of MuslimCreatvs

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Speaking your truth and telling your story as a Muslim in the media is not dependent on “breaking stereotypes”. Amina shares the secrets to her work as a storyteller, setting up your own brand (MuslimCreatvs) and what it means to speak up for yourself.

She also shares with us insights into motivation, authenticity and honesty as a content creator and standing up by standing out in your career.

Tweetables

  1. Motivation is a scam. @ayymina_ #success #podcast #motivation #ShareDiversity
  2. For me motivation doesn't start until you have actually done something @ayymina_ #success #motivation #ShareDiversity
  3. Document your process. So you can physically see the progress @ayymina_ #progress #storyteller #success #ShareDiversity
  4. If you want to start, understand what kind of story you are telling and what are your putting out to the world. @ayymina_ #success #ShareDiversity

Comment below!

 

Check out our Store:

Ilm Power – Shared Diversity – Bag
Halal Healthy Recipes – Breakfast Edition – by Shared Diversity

Power of Voice as a Muslim Women in Mainstream Media, Focus and overcoming judgement with Idil Osman

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We are talking about the power of voice as a Muslim woman in mainstream media, focusing our priorities and overcoming judgement (especially self-judgement) with journalist, author, lecturer, expert in diaspora media and TV host Dr Idil Osman.

Besides sharing her career principles and journey into media, Idil speaks about her definition of hijab and how we can create platforms to amplify each other’s voices.

Tweetables

  1. Career: Find something 1.You're passionate about. 2. That allows you to contribute to society 3.That allows you to have an ongoing opportunity for employment. @idil_osman #success #ShareDiversity
  2. It's about focusing on this ONE thing. In my case that's Allah, that's who I want to please. You focus on your priorities, everything else will fall into place. @idil_osman #focus #success #ShareDiversity
  3. One of the good things about Islam is that, because you're constantly focused on the blessings that Elahi has given you, you're in that space of wanting to give back. @idil_osman #gratitude #ShareDiversity
  4. Faith - It provides me the #hijab I need in order to navigate through life. Not just the physical hijab but the hijab of people taking advantage of me, being harmful towards me. @idil_osman #ShareDiversity
  5. Holding on to Allah I´m synonymously protected from the harmful effects that society can bring sometimes. @idil_osman #ShareDiversity
  6. By having an outward-looking approach to people means I attract those kinds of people ... because you take an active stance of being a good human being, to begin with. @idil_osman #ShareDiversity
  7. If you are grounded, if you are anchored in terms of who you are, where you come from and where you're headed, you're really not limited by any location. @idil_osman #impact #ShareDiversity
  8. Everyone has a voice. What happens is that people get silenced. Keep pushing for spaces to be opened up so that a variety of voices can come through. @idil_osman #WomenInMedia #WomeninTech #ShareDiversity
  9. Sheytan will try and create arrogance out of everything. Make you look like you're superior because of your race, gender or skin colour. @idil_osman #racism #ShareDiversity
  10. We need to have a daily discussion and conscious application that we are #Muslim first. The experience that connects us is that loving brotherhood and #sisterhood. @idil_osman #racism #ShareDiversity

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4 Things Khabib teaches Muslim Women

Trust

4 Things Muslim Women can learn from Khabib

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Probably the most controversial fight for a long time. After a rally of misused media attention, tribal followership and disrespectful communication, there have been many people who seem to have an opinion on UFC league and especially the two fighters Khabib Nurmagomedov and Conor Mcgregor.

You might wonder, why we talk about this here. The context is easy: we are all brothers and sisters and despite our imperfections, we all can learn from each other. 

Khabib.

What we can learn from the UFC fighter.

While a lot of people seem to have strong opinions on Khabib, his industry or his behaviour, here is what has to be said: There is a lot of things we can learn from this man, especially as women in the media space.

Disclaimer afterwards because ya´ll forget them anyways if I state them now.

Khabib, the Muslim UFC fighter, praying in public, a role model to many. Art by Ruslan Amirov.

Here are just a few things we want to acknowledge and thank Khabib for. These include specific things that we as influencers, micro-influencers or simply people in a social space can learn from him.

1) Remind people of Allah

We all (hopefully) have that rare friend where we know, “She reminds me of Allah”. We love that friend, and we get both peaceful and shaken when we see her because she reminds us of Allah. Of believing in Allah, of never forgetting Allah, of thanking Allah, or just of being more aware in everything we do of Allah. I truly hope you have that friend if not. May Allah provide you with many of this type, Ameen.
Many people, when they get famous, you see them saying usual words of remembrance as “Alhamdulillah” or “Inshallah” less. We can see it in Youtubers, Bloggers etc who often get famous by niche targeting the Muslim women with modest content and then go mainstream when the brand and follower attention grows. Not saying that is everyone, but we must admit those are more the rule than the exception.

Among athletes, however, we often see words of remembrance increasing. Not always, but often. We can see the connection between Serena Williams and “praising God” increasing especially in situations of triumph, and of course, we remember Muhammad Ali openly speaking of Allah in many of his fights (plus many other fighters as well). The explanation is not one-sided, but from an athletic viewpoint, we know that the bigger the challenge, the more your mind has to grow muscles while your body grows them.

Your mind is always strongest in the remembrance of Allah, in both defeat and triumph.

Especially in triumph – because that is open to the mass media attention- we can see Khabib pushing attention away from himself and on to Allah´s power. He repeatedly states the name of Allah in almost every situation a camera hits his face.
That is what we need to acknowledge. Many influencers (and we need to discuss the definition of influencers but that’s another story) do NOT use their influence to talk about God. Not even in a scholarly way but just in ANY way. And I get it, we are all on a journey, we are all not perfect, but: We must acknowledge that Khabib is reminding us of Allah. He is not even preaching, he doesn´t speak about the names of Allah or gives us lessons in fiqh but he SIMPLY REMINDS US, that success, is only with Allah. @teamkhabib  

ذكر ان الذكرى تنفع المؤمنين

And remind, for indeed, the reminder benefits the believers.
[Quran 51:55]

So yes, we gotta speak about our influence now.
Media influencers in particular (we all know many of them). If you wanna be mainstream because you want to be, be it but not because your followers say you´re acting too Muslim. Where are the “Alhamdulillah”´s and “Thanks to Allah”? I can only hear, “Thanks to my followers” “Thanks to the people out there”. Nobody is reminded of where your success actually comes from because they are so focused on making their follower happy.

2) Do You

We, especially we women, are heavily criticised in the media. For the way we dress, speak, interact. And the issue is, we care too much. We care so much that we sometimes even don´t care enough. Confused? Well, hold up a moment.
We all see Muslim women going the route of feminism, sometimes moderate, often radical or just passive-aggressively. We do that because we are living in a world filled with idiots, and full of misogyny. But our reactions are often not better than those of the people who criticize our every action. We get passive aggressive, we get openly aggressive, we focus on “proving them wrong”, by arguing (with those who won´t listen anyway) or by blogging our hearts off about the injustice we are facing. What we don´t do is us. We are not doing what WE are inside.

Just DO YOU.

It´s sometimes necessary to just DO YOU and not be influenced - neither from Muslim crowds judging you nore Non-muslims judging you. You can never do you if your actions depend on someone else.

 قَالَ رَسُولُ اللَّهِ صلى الله عليه وسلم ‏ “‏ لاَ تَكُونُوا إِمَّعَةً تَقُولُونَ إِنْ أَحْسَنَ النَّاسُ أَحْسَنَّا وَإِنْ ظَلَمُوا ظَلَمْنَا وَلَكِنْ وَطِّنُوا أَنْفُسَكُمْ إِنْ أَحْسَنَ النَّاسُ أَنْ تُحْسِنُوا وَإِنْ أَسَاءُوا فَلاَ تَظْلِمُوا ‏”‏ ‏.

Hudhaifah narrated that the Messenger of Allah said:
“Do not let yourselves be ‘yes-men’, saying: ‘If the people are good then we will be good, and if they are wrong then we will be wrong.’Rather, make up your own minds, if the people are good then you are good, and if they are evil, then do not behave unjustly.
Reference : Jami` at-Tirmidhi 2007

If you are in the media, you will get criticism from everywhere. So DO YOU but DO YOU completely, without the outside influence. Have your opinion but don´t start trying to fit everyone’s mould; because, in the end, you won´t fit anyone´s.

That is just human nature, we want to belong. But how about belonging to our creator? That’s the only one our actions need to be depending on. This is what we can definitely learn from Khabib. He doesn´t care about Muslim Twitter or Racist Twitter or Drakes opinion. That guy just does his thing.

He goes out, get´s criticized to be a “rat” because he shows “fake respect”. How can you show fake respect anyways, by being respectful but not respecting your values? Well, if that’s the definition I´m showing fake respect to most of the people I have to interact in the workforce, in public spaces etc. As a visibly Muslim woman, you know what that is. Who cares?

We are showing respect, and not putting ourselves down to their level, that is what makes us Muslim. We live our Muslim values, (what´s supposed to happen in ideal situations) by answering hate with love, or (what mostly happens) by answering hate with respect.
Trying to ´fit in´ won´t work. We are strangers in this world anyway, so why not be it fully?

حَدَّثَنَا مُحَمَّدُ بْنُ عَبَّادٍ، وَابْنُ أَبِي عُمَرَ، جَمِيعًا عَنْ مَرْوَانَ الْفَزَارِيِّ، قَالَ ابْنُ عَبَّادٍ حَدَّثَنَا مَرْوَانُ، عَنْ يَزِيدَ، – يَعْنِي ابْنَ كَيْسَانَ – عَنْ أَبِي حَازِمٍ، عَنْ أَبِي هُرَيْرَةَ، قَالَ قَالَ رَسُولُ اللَّهِ صلى الله عليه وسلم ‏ “‏ بَدَأَ الإِسْلاَمُ غَرِيبًا وَسَيَعُودُ كَمَا بَدَأَ غَرِيبًا فَطُوبَى لِلْغُرَبَاءِ ‏”

It is narrated on the authority of Abu Huraira that the Messenger of Allah (ﷺ) said:
Islam initiated as something strange, and it would revert to its (old position) of being strange. so good tidings for the stranger.
Sahih Muslim 145

Why is Khabib so much himself? Because he knows, he wants to be in an industry which is “respectful” and to achieve that, he has to be a stranger. He has to show a certain amount of respect. He openly says he does not support the promotion of alcohol and the behaviour and words of his opponent, but at the same time, he doesn’t speak about him. He prefers to speak for himself. Don’t care about them, care about yourself. If you want to be successful, your energy can´t be wasted in the idiots that exist around you. Your energy is too much focused on doing you and living according to your values. We can´t be influenced by other peoples lack of values, don´t “refute” or start a Twitter rant.

Just focus on doing You. Do you to the extent that ´they´ are not even part of the discussion anymor
This brings me to the next point, and probably the most important.

3) Trust

You just have to trust.
Khabib knows he is in an industry that is full of haram. But he doesn’t care because he trusts, as long as he doesn´t promote or do haram himself, Allah is with him.
We need to apply this to our lives. You are studying law and your mentor is saying you´ll only get a job if you take off your hijab? TRUST. You are in the financial sector and they say you won´t make money cause all investment products are haram? TRUST. You believe in picking a righteous husband but they want to sell you ´Man don´t care anymore, just pick one who prays´. TRUST.

We must have Tawakkul to be on point in our work. Trust that as the stranger you are, Allah will reward you with much more you can even imagine now.

But tawakkul is not enough, you have to fight for it. Trust is not the only thing that will make your trust it’s keeping up with what you do, work hard. Work HARD.

4) WORK and know your limits.

We all know, we don´t need to say this to women, because to be honest, we are rather over-self-conscious about ourselves than over-confident. But often, in a bad way. We often don´t understand that in a situation, it´s not us who are weak, but it´s how much we can cope with until we break down.
At work, in uni, lifestyle and media, people have an opinion on you and your actions. They talk bad, they may even physically attack you. But you need to know your limits.

Khabib is in this industry for a long time: He wrestled with bears since he´s a child. He did his homework. He knows he can easily win if he puts in the work.

He knows his limits and he fights to the ultimate of those limits.

Not saying, we all have to start going to an MMA training right now, but we would all know our limits better if we´d known our physical limits better. You have to understand how strong you are to understand what can bring you down. What work can you take on and still be mentally sane? What people can you surround yourself with and still stick to your values? How much media can you consume and still hold on to your beliefs?
Understand that there is a certain limit that you shouldn´t cross. Khabib didn´t respond to a fight before the fight. He knows his limits are the ring.
So we need to fight. Be the best in your industry, but know your limits. Be the best Youtuber, but know your limits, be the best lawyer but know your limits, be the best journalist but know your limits.

Work hard, but know your limits. Your limits should be your values and your spiritual, mental and physical peace.

Have you seen the fight actually? For those who don’t want to watch it (out of understandable reasons): Khabib won.

Now, don´t get me wrong I am not comparing our situation in any bit to Khabibs, also because we all want to stay in our lane of taking female examples for ourselves. But I need to get this off my chest because we always act like there is definitely something wrong about this, apart from violence and the shady industry attention, the male dominance displayed and simply the lack of values amongst many fighters out there. We can´t ignore what we (especially as Muslim women) can learn from controversial situations.

 

And lastly:  Khabib is unapologetically Muslim. Thanks @teamkhabib

Thank you Khabib, for the role model you are and May Allah guide you to be the best version of yourself every day. Ameen.

 

AND NOW YOU, share with us your opinion and share this conversation with a sister.

Q: Tell us what you think about Khabib and what we can learn from him or others in the media who are unapologetically Muslim.

Leave your answer down in the comments, and share your diversity with us.

And please don’t forget to rate, like & share the Podcast on iTunes.

 

Disclaimer:
First of all, I would like to ask you to forgive me to put attention on such a topic which has already alerted so many brothers and sisters out there to talk in the worse way about the situation and people involved. Nobody is claiming to be a scholar on this platform, but lemme tell you two things:
(1) As a “born Muslim” you might know many things about Islamic rulings and what is permissible or not, but please make sure you never feel you have all the knowledge. Nobody has. No Ghazali or Mufti Menk, we are all on a journey. May Allah bless all of the Sheikhs and Sheikhas, the people of knowledge that understand so much more than us and try to bring our attention to the lack of our judgement or understanding. However, I give you the privilege as Muslims who probably went to Madrasas teaching you fiqh since 5years old, that you have slightly more tolerance to Muslims who are not following the nor, but might shake up industries such as fashion, music or MMA. Yes, many don´t also but you get my point. I see Muslim brothers out there talking trash on scholars who criticise the sport because they are so understanding of liberal open-mindedness and all that. PLEASE: Speak your truth. but speak it with RESPECT.
(2) As a revert, I acknowledge that (a) I have understanding of what kufars out there are doing, from a viewpoint of having lived that life, and (b) I judge heavily when I see Muslims act in spaces of kufars because of (a), I know what bad outcome these surroundings have. So yes, I am clearly biased. I also know that I think I was “guided” and believe that anyone who would compromise with kufar spaces doesn´t value the privilege of having the enlightenment of Islam. So when I see people in industries which are questionable, I admire Muslims who hold on to their values but at the same time, I wish to not see us represented everywhere, as I value us beyond those spaces. It’s a difficult place to be in. That is why I get inspired by people who hold on and represent their Islamic values and openly portray their Muslimness and I am still happy about scholars who make me understand what exactly is halal and what is haram. Because simply speaking, I didn´t convert with all the knowledge. I learned that critiquing hitting in the face and head, the awra of the man etc is a thing. But also, it makes me happy if you state the facts in a fiqhy way and not claim you are better because you are liberal and the sheikh don´t know anything about sports cause he has a big belly. Please make us reverts understand by speaking with MANNERS.
So for ALL of us Muslims: we are not perfect. Don´t act like you are because you are somehow “open-minded but still Muslim”, don´t act like they are not because they have flaws and so they can´t give their opinion.

About the attack after the fight, you have to know the backstory of McGregors racism.
Also, that’s some humility, if you fear the punishment of your father because you fought back after months of disrespectful, racist commentary and violent (out of the ring) attacks.

Art by Ruslan Amirov. ShareDiversity.

 

Disclaimer: This is a merely personal view of an individual life. None of this is supposed to reflect or exemplify women, reverts, Muslims or even Islam. Self-identification is not to be seen in relation to a group but merely in relation to oneself. One might share this identity but must not publicly announce its speciality or an imagined community created by such. The sharing or not-sharing of identity (with ethnic, cultural, spiritual, gender-specific, nation or whatever other forms of identification) is neither good nor bad but remains personal and private to oneself. The author is voicing personal opinions and rejects any generalization or speaking-forization but rather aims to shed light on one of many diverse stories of one of many diverse individuals in one (or more) of many diverse contexts. Also, the author tends to create grammatically incorrect words to clarify perceived phenomena, opinions or feelings. This blog might include discriminating terms which are emotionally loaded by a long history of oppression and suffrage. Do not read this if you get offended by the cruelty of ignorance. This is still a place for peace and love, the way we all strive to live out our purpose.

 

Feminism – Equality, womanhood and why I am not a feminist

Feminism

Equality, womanhood and why I am not a feminist

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Let´s talk about a widely hated and over-socially-constructed topic:

Feminism.

Equality of men and women. Is that what it stands for? Well, if that is what it stands for, I am out. Women don’t have the same circumstances than men do. I am out because that would mean that we want to be equal to men. I am out because you say women don’t have the same circumstances than men do, so they need to be uplifted to get to the level men are. That implies that:

Men are superior.

Feminism implies the superiority of men, and the want of women to be set equal to them. Wanting to be equal means they are better. Get it now? I don’t wanna be equal to men.

The Muslim Woman

I am a woman and I am proud of being a woman and having the circumstances of my hormones, my ability to think complex, my strong feelings and the fluctuations of them, being able to make life, and the ability to persuade my partner to do anything I want just by being the most feminine version of myself, being able to work and earn money for my self only, not needing to hustle to make my family eat, not needing to provide financially but being able to contribute emotionally, care-ingly and socially, the ability to hide myself from outside views to guard my value.

Let´s be very pragmatic about what women gain in Islam. Imagine, my ability to have my own enterprise (family) with my home-grown workers (kids) and my investor (husband) building my own company culture (household values) and train talent to take over the enterprise (kids grow up and take responsibility for the family) to sit back and enjoy the beauty of my business (retiring, reading books, looking at birds, traveling the world, cuddling my grand-children). And yes, If I want to have a side-hustle/passion project (job), that provides me with income. I don’t need to share this with anyone if I don’t want to, and on top of that, I´m asking the investor (husband) to get a manager for the enterprise (nanny/cleaner/cook etc.) while I am busy with my side-hustle/ passion-project.

That is what I gain from Islam. Not feminism.

Disclaimer: Don’t get me wrong, this is the most ideal version of it. I am privileged if I could do that. But if I live in a poverty environment, I will want to contribute with my hustle to my family and let my husband not have the pressure of such circumstances. And also, in any way, these things are your rights in Islam. Whether you want to take them or not, is your (you as a family unit) choice. Say your husband wants to stay home and home-school the kids while you go out work? That’s your personal choice and totally right. But at least you know the rights that are given to you, can be implemented whenever you want.

Let me now outline feminism for ya´ll(and please read the disclaimer to save your hate comments).

What feminism gives you:

Option 1: Calling you “traditional” (being a devoted wife) and “backwards” (housework and raising children) or even barbaric (homeschooling) while telling you, you are giving no value (money) to the country because you are not “economically contributing” (hustling for minimum wage) and you are not progressing (doing the same as a man).

Option 2: Complementing you on your value (money) because your are “economically contributing” (working nine to five hustles) while degrading your value (paying you less), calling you a workaholic and claiming your kids are suffering the modern ambitions (because you have a nanny to watch out for your kids) while telling you that you degrade your husband’s masculinity (if you earn more).

So basically, they want you to be like a man and still be a woman. Applied feminist politics expects women to be everything at the same time. We get equality*, but no justice.

*also: we get equality by forced regulations, which are in itself discriminating against who? Men. Compromising one for the other, that’s applied feminism. 

I don’t believe in equality

The base for feminism is, that men and women are socially, economically and politically equal. So no, I am not a feminist. Because I don’t believe in the economic and social equality for women. I believe in the justice for women and men in society. I believe in just contribution of economic, social and familial responsibility. The laws and rules are the same in terms of spiritual matters. 

  اِنَّ الۡمُسۡلِمِيۡنَ وَالۡمُسۡلِمٰتِ وَالۡمُؤۡمِنِيۡنَ وَالۡمُؤۡمِنٰتِ وَالۡقٰنِتِيۡنَ وَالۡقٰنِتٰتِ وَالصّٰدِقِيۡنَ وَالصّٰدِقٰتِ وَالصّٰبِرِيۡنَ وَالصّٰبِرٰتِ وَالۡخٰشِعِيۡنَ وَالۡخٰشِعٰتِ وَالۡمُتَصَدِّقِيۡنَ وَ الۡمُتَصَدِّقٰتِ وَالصَّآئِمِيۡنَ وَالصّٰٓـئِمٰتِ وَالۡحٰفِظِيۡنَ فُرُوۡجَهُمۡ وَالۡحٰـفِظٰتِ وَالذّٰكِرِيۡنَ اللّٰهَكَثِيۡرًا وَّ الذّٰكِرٰتِ ۙ اَعَدَّ اللّٰهُ لَهُمۡ مَّغۡفِرَةً وَّاَجۡرًا عَظِيۡمًا

Indeed, the Muslim men and Muslim women, the believing men and believing women, the obedient men and obedient women, the truthful men and truthful women, the patient men and patient women, the humble men and humble women, the charitable men and charitable women, the fasting men and fasting women, the men who guard their private parts and the women who do so, and the men who remember Allah often and the women who do so - for them Allah has prepared forgiveness and a great reward. [Al-Ahzab 33:35]

So yes, I believe in the equal value of men and women in front of Alllah and yes, as the prophet (PBUH) implemented it, I do believe in the equivalent right on education.

I endorse fair opportunities, but I don’t think we can claim equality if we are the diverse humans we are, with the diverse abilities, strengths and weaknesses, interests, psyches, physics as we have.

... And the diverse responsibilities that we have. Imagine you have a company, and every single employee of yours has the same tasks to manage, the same things to do and has the exact same contribution in everything to the team. Would you grow? Obviously not. Because where is the team here? It´s just a group of sameness, a repetition of one and the same talent. For the business women in here, check out why a relationship functions as a business. For now:

Not an upgrade

I am a woman and I do not endorse feminism. I believe in justice in the responsibilities and opportunities of men and women. We are not the same, so I am not trying to be equal to men. Because I know as a woman, I can do more and I can do better than men in many areas, and I think a man (be it my father, my brother or my son) can do more and better in many other areas. I am not interested to compete in these areas for equality to them. That would be a downgrading for me, not an upgrade.

     اِنَّ اللّٰهَ يَاۡمُرُ بِالۡعَدۡلِ وَالۡاِحۡسَانِ وَاِيۡتَآىـئِ ذِى الۡقُرۡبٰى وَيَنۡهٰى عَنِ الۡفَحۡشَآءِ وَالۡمُنۡكَرِ وَالۡبَغۡىِ ۚ يَعِظُكُمۡ لَعَلَّكُمۡ تَذَكَّرُوۡنَ

Indeed, Allah orders justice and good conduct and giving to relatives and forbids immorality and bad conduct and oppression. He admonishes you that perhaps you will be reminded. [An-Nahl 16:90]

As long as I understand my value as a woman, I don´t need feminist narratives to make me ´regain´ my power. I have power in me enough to prove my voice matters, my actions matter, my being matters.

AND NOW YOU, share with us your opinion and share this conversation with a sister.

And please don't forget to rate, like & share the Podcast on iTunes.

Q: What are your thoughts on feminist narratives? Would you consider yourself a feminist, do you fight for gender equality? Why or why not?

Leave your answer down in the comments, and share your diversity with us.

Women´s rights sold as an ideology. One of the most marketed social constructs. Gender equality in Islam is based on deeper values. We must first embody these values to truly reclaim our rights.

 

Disclaimer: This is a merely personal view of an individual life. None of this is supposed to reflect or exemplify women, reverts, Muslims or even Islam. Self-identification is not to be seen in relation to a group but merely in relation to oneself. One might share this identity but must not publicly announce its speciality or an imagined community created by such. The sharing or not-sharing of identity (with ethnic, cultural, spiritual, gender-specific, nation or whatever other forms of identification) is neither good nor bad but remains personal and private to oneself. The author is voicing personal opinions and rejects any generalization or speaking-for-ization but rather aims to shed light on one of many diverse stories of one of many diverse individuals in one (or more) of many diverse contexts. Also, the author tends to create grammatically incorrect words to clarify perceived phenomena, opinions or feelings. This blog might include discriminating terms which are emotionally loaded by a long history of oppression and suffrage. Do not read this if you get offended by the cruelty of ignorance. This is still a place for peace and love, the way we all strive to live out our purpose.

 

Relationship Mindset – Gender Equality in Islam?

Relationship Mindset

Gender Equality in Islam?

 

Rate the Podcast on iTunes.

“Husband and wife are equal.” “Equality for unity.” “Why shouldn´t a woman be able to do the same as a man?” “A healthy relationship works on the ground of equal rights” …

The theory sounds well, practice.. naaaatsomuch.

Let´s talk about how relationships work and let´s be pragmatic about it.
It´s teamwork. And how does teamwork work? Well, …
Like a business.

For those with some prior business knowledge, and those without. Check the abbreviations** and turn your volume up to listen.

Relationships are like businesses

In a business, there is a CEO (the Entrepreneur)**and an MD (Managing Director)**.

Both of them work on the business (from the outside) but both have very different viewpoints on the growth of the company.

The CEO

looks in the future and decides
– where the business should go strategically,
– what the long-term goals are and what strategic and
– what creative ways they should go to achieve the shared vision.

makes sure that
– there is always investment flowing into the business, so the MD can upgrade the tool efficiency and work effectiveness.

The Manager

looks from the future to the present and plans
– how the business should work (what the employees should do),
– to achieve the goals in the present and short-term goals.

makes sure that
– the business itself provides flourishing returns on such investment by upgrading the employees’ performance.

Imagine now husband and wife

Husband = CEO
Wife = Manager

Read the disclaimer before you shout “Whyyyy always the man…!”

The husband goes out and sees where the family wants to be in terms of wealth (whatever this means to you individually), in terms of achievements (spiritually and charitably, academically and professionally, personally and internationally) and in terms of property (wealth and investment). While the husband goes out and brings in the investment (income) to the family (company), the wife makes sure that the family affairs (business) work efficiently and effectively and that all members of the family (employees) provide their best performance to bring the right returns (in terms of intellectual property, social achievements, etc.).

These returns can be whatever you define and value as wealth or power.

  • Whether this would be the status of an academically educated child, which the mother (Manager) home-schooled or tutored to excellence (invested the income in high education).
  • Or whether this would be a highly artistic child, which the mother supported in their projects and searched for the best art class and accompanied to galleries and poetry events and went with them to national art competitions outside of school to support the spark of interest.
  • Or whether that mother has invested the income to provide the best health, nutrition and physical fitness education to her children so they can perform at their best in any phase of their lives. While the father makes sure there is enough bonus to surprise her and the kids for a nice vacation to a new country so the whole family can benefit from cultural richness and diverse education to their ongoing inspiration and motivation to keep the quality of the business performance on the highest level throughout the year.

Equality vs. Teamwork

Now think, if this would be possible if husband and wife would be equal (feminism) and do the same exact things and have the same exact responsibilities.

And by the way, read the disclaimer.

Because it really does not matter whether you would like to (personally) flip around this script. Let the mother be the CEO and the father the MD. Or whether you would like to swap every 5 years. But chose your roles. Because that’s how a team works…

Choosing your roles is essential because no one can scale up their performance if they are unsure what responsibilities they have. Greatness comes with focus and persistence.

 

Disclaimer: Every couple can, of course, choose for themselves. Wanna be a CEO and invest, get money in and inspire future strategies for 5years and then swap to dedicate and manage the business internally? Go for it. Whatever fits you (as a team).

 

AND NOW YOU, share with us your opinion and share this conversation with a sister.

Q: How would you apply this to your life and relationship? What value can you get out of this family-business construct?

Leave your answer down in the comments, and share your diversity with us.

And please don’t forget to rate, like & share the Podcast on iTunes.

 

Family, Relationship and love in Islam are all about balancing roles and responsibilities. I see relationships as a business. Family business. Gender Equality in Islam is a myth just as it is in any other sector of our human existence. The relationship mindset means teamwork.

 

** Business Abbreviations
CEO
(=Chief Executive Officer) makes the tough decisions based on the company’s needs, values and goals, sets up a strategy for the company future and increases flows of investments into the company
MD (=Managing Director) the most important working director, in charge of the way the company is managed, supervising employees performance and outcomes

 

Disclaimer: This is a merely personal view of an individual life. None of this is supposed to reflect or exemplify women, reverts, Muslims or even Islam. Self-identification is not to be seen in relation to a group but merely in relation to oneself. One might share this identity but must not publicly announce its speciality or an imagined community created by such. The sharing or not-sharing of identity (with ethnic, cultural, spiritual, gender-specific, nation or whatever other forms of identification) is neither good nor bad but remains personal and private to oneself. The author is voicing personal opinions and rejects any generalization or speaking-forization but rather aims to shed light on one of many diverse stories of one of many diverse individuals in one (or more) of many diverse contexts. Also, the author tends to create grammatically incorrect words to clarify perceived phenomena, opinions or feelings. This blog might include discriminating terms which are emotionally loaded by a long history of oppression and suffrage. Do not read this if you get offended by the cruelty of ignorance. This is still a place for peace and love, the way we all strive to live out our purpose.